Study in China

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China, officially the People’s Republic of China (PRC), is a sovereign state located in East Asia. It is the world’s most populous country, with a population of over 1.35 billion. The PRC is a single-party state governed by the Communist Party, with its seat of government in the capital city of Beijing.

It exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities (Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai, and Chongqing), and two mostly self-governing special administrative regions (Hong Kong and Macau). The PRC also claims Taiwan – which is controlled by the Republic of China (ROC), a separate political entity – as its 23rd province, a claim which is controversial due to the complex political status of Taiwan.

China has become one of the world’s fastest-growing major economies. As of 2013, it is the world’s second-largest economy by both nominal total GDP and purchasing power parity (PPP), and is also the world’s largest exporter and importer of goods. China is a recognized nuclear weapons state and has the world’s largest standing army, with the second-largest defense budget.

China’s climate is mainly dominated by dry seasons and wet monsoons, which lead to pronounced temperature differences between winter and summer. In the winter, northern winds coming from high-latitude areas are cold and dry; in summer, southern winds from coastal areas at lower latitudes are warm and moist. The climate in China differs from region to region because of the country’s highly complex topography.

The People’s Republic of China is the second-largest country in the world by land area after Russia, and is either the third- or fourth-largest by total area, after Russia, Canada and, depending on the definition of total area, the United States. China’s total area is generally stated as being approximately 9,600,000 km2.

The national census of 2010 recorded the population of the People’s Republic of China as approximately 1,370,536,875. About 16.60% of the population were 14 years old or younger, 70.14% were between 15 and 59 years old, and 13.26% were over 60 years old. The population growth rate for 2013 is estimated to be 0.46%.

The universities of China are among some of the top universities in the world; the University of Tsinghua, the University of Peking, the University of Shanghai Jiao University are all ranked in the global top 50 in the 2013 QS World University Rankings, with university of Peking ranked Forty-sixth.

The total numbers of universities in China are more than a few 100. This includes one of the world’s best institutions.  China has had a total of 8 Nobel Prize winners to-date, with few of the recent winners Mo Yan, (Literature, 2012), Liu Xiaobo, (Peace, 2010) and Charles K. Kao*, (Physics, 2009).

Studying in China is an excellent opportunity to explore the world’s most populous country. You will experience China’s unique blend of ancient and modern civilization, as well as its scenic beauty and bustling nightlife. Visit new places with other students from around the world that you’ll meet, and you’ll find yourself opening your eyes not just to China, but to the whole world.

For all international students Studying and living in China is cheaper than studying and living in European countries, the U.S., Japan, South Korea and many other countries

When it comes to economics, China has been the world’s fastest growing country for the past 30 years. Even during the financial crisis, China’s economic growth has maintained a level of 8%, a pace unthinkable in other countries. China’s GDP recently surpassed Japan’s to become the world’s second largest economy after the United States. The world’s top 500 companies all do business in China, with many choosing to base their Asia-Pacific headquarters in the bustling Chinese cities of Hong Kong, Shanghai and Beijing.

China is striving to build more world-class universities, and investing heavily in higher education. Aside from China’s unique Chinese language, calligraphy, martial arts and other cultural subjects, Chinese degree programs in majors such as engineering, science, medicine, economics and trade, MBA as well as finance are highly revered. As for those who don’t know any Chinese, many universities offer degree programs taught in English, so you can earn your degree while learning the most widely spoken language in the world.

Though it may surprise many, Chinese culture and people are extremely diverse and multicultural, consisting of 56 different ethnicities. For example, in Lijiang, in the southern province of Yunnan, twelve different minorities have dwelled together in social harmony for thousands of years, practicing an array of religions spanning from Chinese Buddhism, Taoism, Christianity, and Islam, to many lesser known ones like Tibetan Buddhism and Bimo Religion of Baiyi.

It’s much easier to learn a new language when you’re exposed to it every day. Chinese is no different – in a couple of months you’ll have picked up the basics and within a year you’ll be able to hold a decent conversation. It’s a very useful asset to have, considering that Chinese is spoken by a fifth of the world’s population. And as foreigners who speak it are rare, you’ll have a specialized skill.

If you’re considering working in China in the future, you’ll need to spend time in the country building your ‘guanxi’ (network). Studying in China will give you a chance to build friendships that could turn into professional connections in the future. This is important, as in Chinese culture it’s quite common for jobs to be given to friends of friends, rather than through advertising.

Studying abroad consistently ranks as one of the top things that employers look out for. Though living in China is definitely not as scary as you might think, adapting to a new culture does develop your confidence, independence and problem-solving skills. Time spent studying in a whole new country will give your CV that added edge.

UNIVERSITIES FOR STUDYING IN CHINA

Study in China

Study Abroad:

Education in China is a state-run system of public education run by the Ministry of Education. All citizens must attend school for at least nine years, known as the nine-year compulsory education, which is funded by the government.

Compulsory education includes six years of primary education, starting at age six or seven, and three years of junior secondary education (junior middle school) for ages 12 to 15. Some provinces may have five years of primary school but four years for junior middle school. After junior middle school, there are three years of senior middle school, which then completes the secondary education.

The Ministry of Education reported a 99 percent attendance rate for primary school and an 80 percent rate for both primary and middle schools.[citation needed] In 1985, the government abolished tax-funded higher education, requiring university applicants to compete for scholarships based on academic ability. In the early 1980s, the government allowed the establishment of the first private institution of higher learning, increasing the number of undergraduates and people who hold doctoral degrees fivefold from 1995 to 2005.[4]

In 2003, central and local governments in China supported 1,552 institutions of higher learning (colleges and universities) and their 725,000 professors and 11 million students (see List of universities in China). There are over 100 National Key Universities, including Peking University and Tsinghua University, which are considered to be an elite group of Chinese universities. Chinese spending has grown by 20% per year since 1999, now reaching over $100bn, and as many as 1.5 million science and engineering students graduated from Chinese universities in 2006. China published 184,080 papers as of 2008.[5]

China has also become a top destination for international students.[6] As of 2013, China is the most popular country in Asia for international students and ranks third overall among countries.[6]

Laws regulating the system of education include the Regulation on Academic Degrees, the Compulsory Education Law, the Teachers Law, the Education Law, the Law on Vocational Education, and the Law on Higher Education. See also: Law of the People’s Republic of China.

The universities of China are among some of the top universities in the world; the University of Tsinghua, the University of Peking, the University of Shanghai Jiao University are all ranked in the global top 50 in the 2013 QS World University Rankings, with University of Peking ranked Forty-sixth.

The total numbers of universities in China are more than a few 100. This includes one of the world’s best institutions.  China has had a total of 8 Nobel Prize winners to-date, with few of the recent winners Mo Yan, (Literature, 2012), Liu Xiaobo, (Peace, 2010) and Charles K. Kao*, (Physics, 2009).