Study in United Kingdom

The education system in the UK is different to that in many other countries. At the age of 16, British children take General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examinations. Students then transfer to studying A-Levels which last for two years and qualify them for entry to university. Students tend to specialise in these courses and often study for three or four A-Levels. This means that degrees do not last as long in the UK as other countries.

If you left school with qualifications other than A-Levels or the International Baccalaureate, you may need to take a Foundation course. A Foundation year gives you important focused skills that UK students receive during their A-Levels and often includes English Language tuition.

The United Kingdom has had a total of 115 Nobel Prize winners to-date. With few of the recent winners Michael Levitt, Chemistry 2013,Peter Higgs, Physics 2013,John B. Gurdon, Physiology or Medicine, 2012.

The total number of universities in the UK sum up to 163 universities, which includes one of the world’s best institutions.